Publications

“What more does a man need than a horse, a revolver and a woman with a flower’s name to feel like a king?” writes Rivas and in a single sentence he embraces all the book, galloping through a world of pain and love seen with a look as pure as a child’s, as eccentric as a poet’s. In this book of sixteen tales that constitute a whole are heart-breaking stories in which the feeling of things precedes the things themselves, the end is in need of interpretation, and every image is a human cell – incomparable and trembling with life. The delicate style, the way the stories grab the reader, the erudite respect towards the reader and the ability to charge things with love place the author and this book forever on the list of classic works not to be missed.

Suso de Toro’s books appear like screenplays or simple plays. You can count the main heroes on your fingers; dialogue governs the action, characters and environment. The feeling is one of careering along in a Land Rover. Considered by critics as the author of degraded urban surroundings, a pornographic viewpoint and the deconstruction of language, he rushes unexpectedly into a biblical (or Shakespearean) story of fratricide and incest born out of envy not towards the other, but towards a third side. A Bermuda triangle of parents and children, lovers and customers of the flesh, where the privacy of family is a bargain, and sin isn’t just a parasite that feeds off a foreign body, but the air needed for surviving, or even burning.

In his most recent collection, Yordan Eftimov again provokes with the presence or absence of a lyrical hero. His poems are hot-honest and endowed with an ill-defined presence. Using the evolutionary development of the human being from an amoeba to a killer or the act of making love on top of a grave, regardless of the ugliness or beauty of the gesture, the main purpose being to arouse the senses, the author provides a true story which clouds thoughts in order to awaken the reader from his lethargy.

Winner of both the Ivan Nikolov and the Hristo Fotev Poetry Awards in 2013.

Plamen Antov’s poetry has always been rich in images, thought provocations and post-modern references. In this book, however, the author places a greater emphasis on immediate experiences of politics and nature, with an instability in the language like literature or a judge and medium between the higher and ordinary. The value of language depends on the author’s position between these two poles. To serve mammon or God.

The material and spiritual dimensions combine in this unusual book of poems from the experienced Bulgarian poet and translator Rada Panchovska. She gives us her vision of city life, managing to note down details that are important but often pass unnoticed. She steps through the borders of the contemporary world and the natural world we all inhabit with an ecological footprint, displaying sensitivity and cautiousness.

This novel is located somewhere between the genres of fantasy and political prose. The mysticism in the book is a metaphor for the breakdown of Albanian life, lost between generations and times. The past is full of guilt, the present is purgatory, and the future is an incarnation in a home for blind people. This is a desperate story about the post-totalitarian collapse of the soul, which wanders like an eel through a maze of underground rivers. To quote the newspaper Korrieri, “The prose doesn’t just roll along the lines, it flies.”

This is the only the second book written in the Galician language of northwest Spain to be translated into Bulgarian. Widely acclaimed and widely translated, The Carpenter’s Pencil is a story of love set against the backdrop of the Spanish Civil War. The author, Manuel Rivas, seeks to dispel the darkness of hate with the light of fantasy, humour and tenderness. Günter Grass claimed to have learnt more about the Spanish Civil War from reading this novel than from any history book.

An anthology of sixty poems in Bulgarian translation. The American writer Raymond Carver had a difficult life but managed to find peace in the end. These sixty poems chart his journey from drunken beginnings to the realization that someone was waiting for him and happiness can be found in the simplest moments, for example watching the newspaper boy and his friend walk up the road in the early morning. The author comes out of himself to view himself from the outside and then to break in: “I bashed that beautiful window and stepped back in”. This is a book that is never without humour and modesty, the lessons of years.

In this book of nine essays written in Bulgarian and accompanied by colour photographs, the poet and critic Tsvetanka Elenkova travels from her native Bulgaria to Greece, Turkey, Macedonia, Serbia and England. Along the way, she shares her impressions of Athens, Delphi and the Dodecanese, of Alanya, of Kas and Megisti, where Turkey and Greece come face to face, of Lake Ohrid, the deepest in the Balkans, and Struga in Macedonia, famous for its poetry evenings, of the Serbian monasteries of Frushka Gora and finally of England, where she visits London, Chichester, Oxford and Portsmouth. In this book, the author connects legend with what she sees, a Balkan thread that ends up unexpectedly in England.

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