SmallStations - Teodora Tzankova

Who says young and old cannot live together? This book proves the opposite, when the old reach the age at which they start to think like children and the young are of that strange type that has a long nose, skin with spots and hair sticking out from behind like a horn. Young and old inhabit a single world in which museums are villains, umbrellas are insects, the world is smaller than the cemetery and the soul more rigid than that of the antelope. Here the most important vehicle is the tram, a journey on which is like climbing an 8,000-metre peak. You cannot fail to observe the author’s unconventional narrative, which is tight and compelling (the book won the Spanish National Book Award), for fearless ‘heroes’, not ordinary, but different people. Reading matter that is compelling in its rich fantasy and things that are said in other words.

Agustín Fernández Paz’s book can be called not a bestseller, but a thriller. Dealing with the known, but ending with the unknown. Suggesting the expected, but giving the reader the unexpected. Great love, a psychiatric hospital, exorcism and the unravelling of a plot which turns Freud, Jung and civilization upside down. People are a lonely crowd, under and over which the primary forces of nature prevail. They are like in a clamp, from which the only way out, though unreal, is the deceit of the megalopolis. A story so black it oozes tar, which stops you breathing.