Small Stations Poetry in Bulgarian

In his most recent collection, Yordan Eftimov again provokes with the presence or absence of a lyrical hero. His poems are hot-honest and endowed with an ill-defined presence. Using the evolutionary development of the human being from an amoeba to a killer or the act of making love on top of a grave, regardless of the ugliness or beauty of the gesture, the main purpose being to arouse the senses, the author provides a true story which clouds thoughts in order to awaken the reader from his lethargy.

Winner of both the Ivan Nikolov and the Hristo Fotev Poetry Awards in 2013.

Plamen Antov’s poetry has always been rich in images, thought provocations and post-modern references. In this book, however, the author places a greater emphasis on immediate experiences of politics and nature, with an instability in the language like literature or a judge and medium between the higher and ordinary. The value of language depends on the author’s position between these two poles. To serve mammon or God.

The material and spiritual dimensions combine in this unusual book of poems from the experienced Bulgarian poet and translator Rada Panchovska. She gives us her vision of city life, managing to note down details that are important but often pass unnoticed. She steps through the borders of the contemporary world and the natural world we all inhabit with an ecological footprint, displaying sensitivity and cautiousness.

An anthology of sixty poems in Bulgarian translation. The American writer Raymond Carver had a difficult life but managed to find peace in the end. These sixty poems chart his journey from drunken beginnings to the realization that someone was waiting for him and happiness can be found in the simplest moments, for example watching the newspaper boy and his friend walk up the road in the early morning. The author comes out of himself to view himself from the outside and then to break in: “I bashed that beautiful window and stepped back in”. This is a book that is never without humour and modesty, the lessons of years.

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